Plant care tips

KOKEDAMA

I’m delighted that you’ve chosen a kokedama (or ‘moss ball’ simply translated from Japanese). If you’re like me, you’ll soon be hooked on these bundles of joy.

Placement

Avoid direct sunlight for the moss, which prefers shade, but ensure it is a light room so that the plant in the moss ball receives enough sunlight. The bathroom is a great place for them because of the moisture from the steam.

Watering

Regular misting will keep the moss green and lush, so try and keep the moss ball moist at all times if possible. You can do this by spraying the ball with a mister. This can be done in situ where the kokedama is hanging.

As for the plant, the easiest way to tell if it needs water is to feel the moss ball’s weight. A light moss ball is a tell-tale sign that water is needed. To water, dunk the moss ball in a bowl or bucket of tap water for a few minutes, pushing it down if it floats, ensuring that the whole ball is submerged. Remove and allow to excess water to drain, squeezing the moss ball gently if required. Watering every week or two in winter and More frequently in summer is recommended.

Note: Looking after houseplants can be hit and miss for the best of us. The moss may turn brown over time, but the plant in the moss ball will still be perfectly happy with regular watering and can even be repotted if you wish. On the other hand, if the plant is the troublesome one, you can snip it off at the ball and instead keep the ball of moss thriving. 

JUNGLE WALL CACTUS

The striking Jungle Cactus Wall Mount consists of a living plant mounted onto natural cork bark with a blanket of moss.

Plants that are best suited to these wall displays are called epiphytes, those which live on other plants and trees and get their water and nutrients from dew, air moisture, rainwater and surrounding plant debris.

I have selected plants from the Rhipsalis genera, which are essentially (the wonderful sounding) jungle cacti. What’s great about them is that they’re easy to care for, so they’re perfect for beginner indoor gardeners and those who are not so green fingered. They can tolerate small periods of neglect and even a variety of light conditions – hooray!

Positioning

Low to bright indirect sunlight. Is tolerant of direct sunlight.

Watering

When the moss/soil feels dry, submerge the bottom half of the wall mount (the mossy half) into room temperature tap water for a few minutes for a good soak. Don’t worry about getting the cork wet. Allow any excess water to drain and the cork to dry before returning to its display position.

The moss might also appreciate a misting of water from time to time in between watering sessions.

Note: The moss may turn brown over time. 

CACTI AND SUCCULENTS

Cacti and succulents make striking pot plants – either grouped together or as individual centrepieces. They both have the ability to store water in their leaves or stems and typically grow in areas of low moisture, dry air, bright sunshine, good drainage and high temperatures.

Placement

Place the container in a bright, sunny position where the plants will get at least half a day of sunshine.

Watering

In spring and summer, allow the soil to dry slightly in between watering. After watering, allow the water to drain away. Avoid letting the roots sit in water. A liquid feed can be given during this growing season.

During autumn and winter, reduce the watering frequency to allow the soil to become less moist.

NOTE: Cacti can have a winter rest period where watering is reduced almost completely.

Overwatering will stunt growth and cause the plant to discolour, but under-watering will cause shrivelling.

Note: If you choose to repot your cacti or succulents when they outgrow their container, I recommend using cactus and succulent soil (available at most garden centres). Ensure there is a layer of gravel at the bottom of the new container for good drainage. The new container should also have a drainage hole. 

AIR PLANTS

Watering

Contrary to their name, air plants cannot live on air alone. A weekly bath in a basin or bowl of water (approx. 30 mins), will provide the additional nutrients and moisture they need. When you remove your air plant from the bowl, shake off any excess water, turn it upside down and pop it on a towel to dry. Once dry, the plant will then ready to be displayed again. Alternatively, you can mist the plant if you don’t have time to bath it.

 

Position

A bright spot with indirect sunlight is perfect.

ORCHID WALL MOUNT

The Orchid Wall Mount consists of a living plant mounted onto natural cork bark with a blanket of moss surrounding the root ball.

Plants that are best suited to these wall displays are called epiphytes, those which live on other plants and trees and get their water and nutrients from dew, air moisture, rainwater and surrounding plant debris.

Placement

Indirect sunlight is best in a bright room. Avoid direct sunlight.

Watering

Submerge the bottom half of the wall mount (the mossy half) into room temperature tap water for a few minutes every couple of weeks. Don’t worry about getting the cork wet. Allow any excess water to drain and the cork to dry before returning to its display position.

The moss might also appreciate a misting in between watering sessions to keep it green and lush.

Note: The moss may turn brown over time.

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